Slow Fashion is a documentary series that calls for accountability in the fashion industry:

 

Part One takes place in Southern Mexico where designs are being appropriated from indigenous cultures by major fashion companies like Zara. Mexico's Ministry of Culture asks three global companies for a "public explanation on what basis it could privatize collective property." So the question is posed: Can credit and even compensation be given to these women artisans, where the designs originate, and given the economic disparity between these indigenous communities and the companies appropriating their designs, it becomes a matter of not only collective property rights, but also human rights and the dignity of their culture.

 

Part Two of the series takes place in Laos, where we see how artisans can be treated fairly and compensation can be given by individual designers, operating on a smaller more sustainable scale. The question arises: What is the difference between cultural appropriation and cultural appreciation?

 

Part Three takes place in Jaipur, India and shows how a, International designer in NYC chooses people and the planet over profit by treating artisans as partners and using environmentally sound materials and practices, engaging in a new circular economy. And the impact that one maverick designer has on the consumer, the artisans and the village is palpable. 

Slow Fashion is a documentary that looks at cultural appropriation of indigenous designs by global fashion companies and the communities of women weavers and block printers in Mexico, Laos and India:
First, we go to Oaxaca in Southern Mexico where designs are being appropriated from indigenous cultures by major fashion companies. Mexico's Ministry of Culture has asked these global companies for a "public explanation on what basis it could privatize collective property." So the question is posed: Can credit and even compensation be given to the indigenous designers living in communities where the designs come from? And given the vast economic disparity between local communities of origin and the global companies, who are appropriating their designs; it becomes a matter of not only collective property rights, but also human and cultural rights.

 

Next we arrive at a women’s cooperative in Laos, where we see the craft up close and learn about the value of culture, a window into the craft of weaving and different communities of Laotian weavers. The question arises: How should a designer respect culture and not just take from the artisans, but also return something too?


Finally, we follow Mireia Lopez, a New York City designer, and see how they respect indigenous culture, not just taking designs and craft for financial gain, but also giving back to communities in return. Choosing people over profit, Mirea treats the artisans fairly. The impact one progressive designer can have on the lives of artisans she works with is palpable.